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Gallery 1 > City of Sunderland > Around Sunderland

01.  Penshaw Poppies, Summer 2011

 

02.  The East End, from National Glass Centre Roof

 

03.  Full Bloom, Mowbray Gardens

 

04.  Whitburn Windmill

17.  Textures, Seaburn Beach, towards Roker Pier

 

18.  The Illuminations, Roker Park

 

19.  Roker Marina

 

20.  North-East Winds Hit Roker Promenade

13.  The Gates, Stadium Of Light

 

14.  Seaburn to Roker Promenade

 

15.  Roker Lighthouse

 

16.  The Sun Rises Behind Roker Pier

09.  Golden Carpet, Doxford Park

 

10.  Urban Graffiti, Nile Street

 

11.  The Cemetery, Chester Road to Hylton Road

 

12.  Queen Alexandra Bridge, Deptford

05.  Hylton Castle

 

06.  Pit Wheel, Stadium Of Light

 

07.  Wearmouth, from St. Mary's Car Park

 

08.  West Sunniside

21.  Autumn Colours, St. Peter's Church (674 AD)

 

22.  Red Dawn, Roker Pier

 

23.  Dismantling Crowtree Leisure Centre

 

24.  Frosty Morning Stroll, Herrington Country Park

Sunderland is a city which lies at the heart of the City of Sunderland metropolitan borough, a part of Tyne and Wear, in North East England. It is situated at the mouth of the River Wear. It is the second City of the North East Region after Newcastle upon Tyne.

 

Historically a part of County Durham, there were three original settlements on the site of modern-day Sunderland. On the north side of the river, Monkwearmouth was settled in 674 when Benedict Biscop founded the Wearmouth-Jarrow monastery. Opposite the monastery on the south bank, Bishopwearmouth was founded in 930. A small fishing village called Sunderland, located toward the mouth of the river (modern day East End) was granted a charter in 1179.

 

Over the centuries, Sunderland grew as a port, trading coal and salt. Ships began to be built on the river in the 14th century. By the 19th century, the port of Sunderland had grown to absorb Bishopwearmouth and Monkwearmouth.

 

A person who is born or lives around the Sunderland area is sometimes colloquially known as a Mackem.